DIY Wrapping Paper 2

Well after the success of the scan and print wrapping paper, it was time to step it up a notch or perhaps two. I have another friend who saw the Crow wrapping paper and, with a birthday coming up in June, wanted to know if she might get some special paper too. Coincidentally I had recently bought a lino printing kit as I wanted to experiment with some of the woodcut style drawings I have been drawing recently. So a plan started to form. My friend is a fire horse in Chinese Astrology so I started sketching out some friendly horses with fiery manes and tails. These we based on a photo I’d taken a couple of years ago of a children’s book that had been discarded and found its way into the gutter near where I used to live.

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Draft 1 actually turned out to be one of the better ones.

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But 5 more drafts later I had the final image in my sketch pad which I then scanned and printed to create my template for the lino. Lino prints are always in reverse of the original drawn design due to the way the outline is transferred from original to lino, using the scan and print method I could have reversed the image in a graphics app and then it would have transferred to the lino the ‘right way’ round. I didn’t, and that’s not an issue for this print, just an observation for next time if it’s needed.

Having printed out the design, the next step is to transfer it to the lino. To do this I went over the lines on the print out with a soft 6B pencil building up a thick layer of lead.

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With the lines I wanted to transfer now highlighted, I lay the design face down on the lino. I used the back of a wooden spoon to rub the back of the paper attempting to transfer as much of the pencil line onto the lino as possible. That done, I removed the paper and traced over the barely visible lines on the lino with a HB pencil to mark where I needed to cut. I tried out each of the selection of cutting blades supplied with the kit and a happy while later, with all fingers still intact, I had cut out the body of the horse and marked out the other edges and border.

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Time for a test print! My lino kit included an ink board, ink and a roller – the process is to roll out the ink on the ink board, working it until it is ready to roll onto the lino.

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Fully ‘inked up’ the horse design took on a life of its own and I was ready to print. Unfortunately there’s not a lot of information ‘out there’ on how to successfully create a print. There are cheap presses with bad reviews and expensive presses with good reviews, there’s talk of rollers and wooden spoons. And no-one is ever sure whether it’s lino or paper on top. I opted for paper on top and a good rub with the back to the wooden spoon – top left print.

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So, not enough ink and a very patchy rub with the spoon. More ink and a more consistent rub with the spoon gave me print two – the top right one. The spoon rubbing was still patchy but the ink was better than the first press.

Press three, bottom left, I tried it all the other way up – paper on the bottom and lino on the top – and just pressed really hard with my hand and pressing all over with my fingers. It seemed to be a good solution. Press four, bottom right, was lacking in ink but still better than the first two.

Prints five to eight suffered from a lack of ink and at some point I converted from pressing with my hands to using the back of the spoon again.

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Prints nine to twelve are another mixed bag – this lino printing is trickier than it looks!

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So, that should be plenty of wrapping paper, thank you Horse!

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What to do with the left over ink? Customise my notebook!

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And finally I created a ‘print’, ready for signing, dating and framing.

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If you’d like a copy of the Lino print wrapping paper then you can download an A4 sized image file here, just print it out to create the wrapping paper. There’s also a version of the wrapping paper with one of the prototype horse designs which you can download here. If you enjoyed the article and love the paper then please consider sending me 99p in thanks here. Enjoy!

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